The Artery SIGN Craven

1st, 2nd and 15th October 2022
(Skipton venue to be confirmed)

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Photographs reproduced by kind permission of Great Place Lakes and Dales.

What is it?

With funding from Screen Industries Growth Network, The Artery is delighted to offer a programme for young people starting out on their freelance creative careers in the Screen Industries. We are offering a three-day programme supported by three hour-long mentoring sessions to help you create a business/creative practice that works to your strengths.

The programme in Craven will take place in Skipton Town Hall’s Education Rooms on 1st, 2nd and 16th October 2022. With a focus on animation and AR,  you will explore the vision for your business, the business skills you need and the business stories you want to tell. The programme is based on a Story of Change Model and uses Action Learning so you are in control of the changes you make. We bring in industry professionals to support and facilitate.

Virpi Kettu
Photo © Virpi Kettu

Who’s involved?

Karen Merrifield is founder of the Artery and has a long history in the cultural and heritage sector. She also holds an MBA and an MA in Education by Research but values reative and cultural business and project management models.

Virpi Kettu
Virpi is an award winning director, animator and digital artist with over two decades long career working extensively in Europe and Canada. Virpi has Animated for Aardman Animations for the “Wallace and Gromit”, ‘Shaun the Sheep’, ‘Creature Comforts’ and for The National Film Board of Canada, DreamWorks and Universal Pictures.

 

Who’s it for?

The Programme is for young people starting out in the screen industries interested in a freelance or creative career. Participants are usually aged 18 – 35, but there is some flexibility here.

The workshop is free. This is a funded programme so although free to participants there are costs involved. We ask that anyone who signs up commits to attending fully.

Photo credit: Chris Werrett